Friday, March 2, 2012

My Reading List for 2012

I am a book 'junkie'.  I have lots and I crave more all the time.  But this year will be different.  This year, I am setting the intention to actually READ them - cover to cover.  In the past, I have been a 'skimmer'.   I will get a new book, start reading parts of it and then get overwhelmed because "oh, there is another book I want to read!', so the previous one gets shelved for a little while.  I truly love reading, and it provides that much needed down time.  So it is a new start for me and my books.  Plus, I am tired of dusting them every week :)  This creates more work and I am trying to simplify my life.  


I love using Amazon wish list to keep track of what I want to read.  Always a gift idea lurking there!  


Here is my reading list for this year.  Feel free to copy and steal what you like.  We can compare notes in December.


My goal is one book per month, and two per month during the summer months.  I think that is doable.


Vitamin K2 and the Calcium Paradox by Dr. Kate Rheaume-Bleue ND
I am half way through this book.  Vitamin K2 - a little-known vitamin that humans once thrived on but has been ignored by science for almost 70 years.  Millions of people take vitamin D and calcium supplements for bone health.  New research shows that this actually increases the risk of heart attack and stroke because the added calcium builds up in the arteries - the calcium paradox.  The secret to keeping bones strong and arteries healthy is vitamin K2.  
(As a side note: I love reading books by other NDs.  Dr. Kate was my supervisor during my 4th year of internship.  I have that "I know her" feeling - a "groupie" kind of thing.  And I am so proud that others are continuing the work of Dr. Weston Price.)


Folks this Ain't Normal:  A Farmer's Advice for Happier Hens, Healthier People and a Better World by Joel Salatin
Change the world, one meal at a time.  A successful, sustainable farmer in Virginia discusses how far removed we are from the simple, sustainable joy that comes from living close to the land and the people we love. Salatin has many thoughts on what normal is and shares practical and philosophical ideas for changing our lives in small ways that have big impact.


The Four Fold Path to Healing by Thomas Cowan MD
As a sequel to Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon, this book provides an outstanding example of what the  naturopathic philosophy of medicine ought to be.   This should  be on the mandatory reading list of any naturopathic college.    





Wild Fermentation: The Flavour, Nutrition and Craft of Live-Culture Foods by Sandor Ellix Katz
I am preparing myself for nature's harvest this coming growing season.  I want to ferment beans, beets, carrots, turnip and, of course, my beloved sauerkraut.  Lacto-fermented pickles and garlic are also on my list.  This book will everything that I need to know.



Four Season Harvest:  How to Harvest Fresh Organic Vegetables from your Home Gardens All Season Long by Eliott Coleman
I actually own this book - it was one that I skimmed last summer :)  I really want to have a little greenhouse in my backyard so I can continue to grow fresh greens all year round.  I just wasn't ready for another project last year after we got our square-foot gardens going.  So this is the year!  






Homemade Living with Ashley English is a series of 4 books:  Home Dairy, Canning and Preserving, Keeping Bees and Keeping Chickens.  I am most interested in extending my culinary experiences of yogurt and kefir into cheese and butter.  Homemade cheese!  Can you imagine? My mouth is literally watering.  And why not look forward to a small apiary someday?  


Which brings me to the next two titles....
Barnyard in Your Backyard:  A Beginner's Guide to Raising Chickens, Ducks, Geese, Rabbits, Goats, Sheep, and Cows by Gail Damerow
Someday I expect we will live in the country again and when that happens....look out.  I will re-live my milking days!!  Cover-alls, muck boots, manure.....sweet!





The Backyard Homestead:  Produce all the food you need on just 1/4 acre! by Carleen Madigan
Well you get the picture!  
I hope this book will help me increase the yield in our garden this year.  



And back to books on food and food politics.....


The Ethics of What We Eat:  Why Our Food Choices Matter by Peter Singer
The author follows three families and their grocery-buying habits, and examines their motivation behind making food choices.  An important read for those concerned about the journey of their food from farm to plate.  






The Untold Story of Milk by Ron Schmid, ND
I have embraced nature's perfect food - raw milk.  I am interested in learning the role of raw milk over the ages, the problem that led to mandatory pasteurization, and the politics of the dairy industry.  I think this title will lead me to read two more:  The Raw Milk Revolution and the Devil in the Milk.  I will call those the bonus round :)
Food Politics by Marion Nestle
The author details the food industry and how the use of advertising influences our poor dietary choices.  We assume because the 'experts' say it is healthy that it is truth.  Nutritional advice today is based on getting a piece of the money pie and does not have our best interests at heart.  




The Mindful Carnivore:  A Vegetarian's Hunt for Sustenance by Tovar Cerulli
It is pretty obvious that I like to read about food and where our food comes from.  This book is about the complex relationship between humans and our food, whether it be animal or vegetable.  Another person's search for a better way to stock the fridge.  


The Contented Little Baby by Gina Ford
I think modern pregnancy and baby books are full of bad advice, especially when it comes to nutrition.  They just rub me the wrong way.  But I have heard good things about this book so I am willing to give it try and just see if maybe there is at least one decent book out there on newborn parenting.  




Earthing:  The Most Important Health Discovery Ever? by Clinton Ober
Discover the planet's powerful, amazing, and overlooked natural healing energy and how we can readily connect to it. This book describes how the physical disconnect with the Earth creates abnormal physiology and contributes to inflammation, pain, fatigue, stress, and poor sleep. By reconnecting to the Earth, we can be healthier.


How about you?  What are you reading or look forward to reading this year?  Please share your book suggestions in the comments below.  

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